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Category: Bible Reliability

Audio of July 14th KFUO interview

Below is the MP3 of the KFUO radio broadcast on July 14th.  My segment is the last one, beginning at 5:30 p.m. The topic is, broadly, ‘the uniqueness of Christianity.’… continue reading...

Essay published on Apologetics315.com on Christianity and the nature of Judaism

Apologetics315 is publishing an essay series on the veracity of Christianity.  I was asked to contribute an essay.  That essay was published today.  You should take some time to check out the other essays, too.

Much ink has been spilled in defense of the historicity of the resurrection of Jesus, and I myself have spilled my fair share. Similarly, the stunning explosion of the Christian Church within the Roman Empire has been raised as a phenomenon that requires explanation and a dead man rising from the dead is the best one. These efforts are valid, but their weight cannot … continue reading...

Comparing Apples to Oranges Without Even Knowing it

This morning I read this article trying to diminish the strength for the evidence of Christianity by attacking the eyewitnesses at its core.

To begin with, Mr. Pulliam, the blogger, says, “even if the gospels do record eyewitness testimony, that is no guarantee of their accuracy.”   Responding to a book on the subject, Mr. Pulliam says, “Bauckham maintains that the gospels are reliable history because the accounts contained in them are either from eyewitness testimonies or very close to eyewitness testimonies.”

If Bauckham really presents his argument in this fashion it will be the first that I’ve heard it that … continue reading...

The Epistemological Bottleneck And God’s Respect for Human Inquiry

One of the enduring criticisms against Christianity is that it is anti-knowledge, education, and learning.  This blog has taken aim at this criticism before, most notably taking Richard Dawkins to task for his misuse of an Augustine quote ostensibly about ‘curiosity.’  I currently have an open challenge to Dawkins to repudiate his use of that quote.

In point of fact, these anti-knowledge criticisms really only began with the rise of the Fundamentalists and this in turn was spurred on by the rise of Darwinism.  Even the shallowest of research will reveal that Christians have been at the forefront of investigation, … continue reading...

The Theological Implications of Finding Alien Extra-Terrestial Life

I have already addressed this in several places- here, and here– so I won’t dwell on things much.  Instead, I want to reflect on an article I just read regarding the Vatican participating in an astrobiology conference to discuss the question.

In my previous posts, I argued that if aliens appeared, they might fly in the face of current expectations that are drenched in an evolutionary (and atheistic) outlook.  Namely, we may find that these intelligent agents believe in God.  They may not, as Richard Dawkins smugly posits, inquire first as to whether not humans have ‘discovered’ evolution.   Let … continue reading...

Some More Thoughts on ABC’s Visitors

So ABC’s “V” was on again tonight.  I enjoyed it.  It lacked the same punch as the first episode but I still liked it.  It seems a little hurried to me.  Maybe there are too many commercials?  I’ve seen other hour long shows that seemed to really carry a narrative so I know its possible.  I can’t put my finger on it with “V” but it isn’t enough (yet) to push me away from future viewings.

In my previous post on the “V” series, I hoped that I would see some metaphysical conversation.  Perhaps its too early in the … continue reading...

Atheism as ‘Gateway Drug’ to Drifting Away

As of this writing, I am facilitating a course/discussion regarding the decline of Christianity in America.  Someone made a point in the discussion that is similar to one I’ve made previously… but I can’t find where I made it so I’m making it anew.  🙂

The question begins with a look at the measured increase in self-identified ‘religious nones’ in America since around 1990.  (This data can be found linked to here.)  In 1990, some 8% of Americans identified themselves as having no religion.  Today, that figure has doubled.  In the meantime, there has been a drop in … continue reading...