web analytics

Category: General

Logical Fallacy: The Scaffolding Fallacy

In the course of almost 20 years of experience debating and discoursing with people of various viewpoints, I have encountered arguments that are fallacious which nonetheless do not, as far as I know, have ‘official’ names to them.  This might be because the ‘fallacy’ is in fact part of someone’s entire outlook, and does not present as a distinct formal argument.

I’ve always meant to deliberately lay some of these out, but like so much of what I want to say and do, time, energy, and circumstance seem to war against it.  I have a mental list of these.  Occasionally … continue reading...

What Went Wrong With the Left?

Ha!  I know, right?  In under 3,000 words?  Not bloody likely.  Part 1, maybe?

This is a continuation of a series attempting to distill several years of thinking into important background to understand me better when I take issue with the whole vocabulary of ‘left’ and ‘right’ but also to follow me when I explain my thoughts on the prospect of an American civil war, something I’ve heard many on both the ‘left’ and the ‘right’ talk about.  This post ultimately should be read in the context of the rest of the series.

I feel that we need to digest … continue reading...

This is why we absolutely hate the ‘New’ Left

I’m breaking my ‘wait a while’ rule and interrupting a more substantial series, but this little tidbit was just too ‘good’ to pass up.

Why do conservatives like myself utterly despise what the ‘left’ has become?  Or, if you prefer, became, c. 1910?

Well, there is a long list, really.  Of late, we’ve witnessed two years worth of outright fabrications of racism and character assassinations, cheered on by even the ‘best’ elements within liberalism.   Lest this post get overwhelmed with a detailed list of the vile things that liberals have done or advocated, let me get to this doozy, … continue reading...

The Good Liberal

The last few posts have been dedicated to exploring different kinds of leftists and this last one, truly in the spirit of saving the best for last, lays out the attributes of a ‘good’ liberal.  The purpose of this series is twofold.  First, I am unhappy with the traditional ‘left’/’right’ paradigm for accounting for one’s political persuasions and in order to offer something better–even if used only by me, I need to draw some distinctions.  Similarly, in all the talk about a coming ‘civil war,’ distinctions need to be made within the political persuasions that ‘left’ vs ‘right’ simply aren’t … continue reading...

The Leftist Elitist Statists — Pardon the redundancy

I had thought I was going to be finishing my series on the different strains of leftists in America by talking about good liberals who are actually good, and then realized another category needed discussion before I tackled them.  And in case you’re wondering, this is all going somewhere.  There is a reason why I’m drawing distinctions between the kinds of leftists that are out there.  It has something to do with the putative ‘civil war’ that is increasingly talked about as on its way.  But, before I will talk about it, I need to make some distinctions.  (Which also … continue reading...

The Worthless Nice People

I began an analysis of the different kinds of leftists in my last post, where I used a ‘handbook’ on Antifa as my jumping off point.  Ultimately, I’m going to be arguing that the terms ‘left’ and ‘right’ to describe political ideologies are useless and will offer my own terms and classifications.  In the meantime, for the purposes of this post, the characterization of ‘liberals’ and ‘progressives’ as ‘leftists’ will be used since it is what everyone uses.  I do so only with reluctance.  When I am done hashing out the ‘left’ I will turn my attention to the ‘right.’… continue reading...

The Most Dangerous of All: Bad Men, who think they are Good Men

In my last post, I mentioned that in forthcoming posts I was going to attempt to lay out some distinctions between  the kinds of leftists that are out there.  This post is the first of these, and I’ve decided to use a book by Mark Bray called Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook as my jumping off point.  This post isn’t a ‘review,’ per se, but meant to provide a concrete example to use as a sustained illustration of my concerns about what dangers the ‘Left’, in part, and in whole, poses to the United States, if not the entire world.… continue reading...

Syrian, Iran, and the Conditioned Responses

In my last post, I jumped off the anniversary of the shameful silence of the MSM about the Politico’s expose of Obama administration policy to look the other way on Hezbollah’s drug trafficking in order to secure the Iran deal, but that was mainly because of the timing.  There are better examples of the intertwining threads of toxic attitudes and behaviors that I am concerned will explode into great chaos in the United States unless confronted decisively.   Today’s post will focus on some of those examples, but I frankly confess that there is no sign that such a confrontation, and … continue reading...

Yes! Someone who gets it! The Office of the Presidency has too much Power!

I’ve been saying it for years! This article in USA Today pretty well nailed it:  The office of the presidency is waaaaaaay too powerful… and this is in defiance of the Constitution.

I’ll let the article speak for itself.  I will repeat some of the things I’ve been saying…

A system where the fate of the country rises and falls based on the actions of a single person… is a stupid, stupid system.  Ever since I’ve been paying attention, presidents have been getting credit, or the blame, for job creation, stock market fluctuations, housing booms, etc.  What genius thought it … continue reading...

Why Republicans Lost in 2018

We ought to keep it in perspective.  True, the House flipped to the Dems, but in many of the lost seats, the incumbent Republican decided to retire.  There were about 40 such retirements.  The idea that the Dems have some kind of mandate is silly in light of the fact that the GOP not only held the Senate, but picked up seats.   The Dems know this, even if their media allies (pardon the redundancy) and much of their base is blissfully unaware.  Similarly, in Wisconsin, where I reside, the GOP clobbered the Dems in both the House and the Senate.  … continue reading...

The IRS and the (continued) White Washing of Obama Years

I didn’t want to write another blog entry for awhile but I came across this article and thought I had something definite to say about it, and it wouldn’t take long to say it.  Then I finished the article and realized there was much more to be said.  But that didn’t mean my interest in saying it increased.  I have better things to do… and yet I can’t resist at least touching on them.

I have frequently advised that one of the ways you can tell if someone is off their rocker is if they cannot keep things in proportion.  … continue reading...

Jim VandeHei’s Four Fake Ways to ‘fix’ fake news

I don’t know Jim VandeHei, and despite being a heavy consumer of news and information, don’t frequent Axios news, unless it is referred to me.  In fact, that’s how I saw his article on ‘4 ways to fix fake news‘; I saw it on the Drudge.  I don’t have an ax to grind about Axios.  I’m indifferent.  But, if his article achieved anything, it is to persuade me that I should take a position re: Axios:  against it.

He lists 4 ‘provocative’ ideas.  I’m going to take serious issue one of them in particular, and then circle back … continue reading...

Accusation as Political Weapon

So, here we go again.

The Democrats have once again turned to alleging that something occurred in the distant past, with no way to come close to what could count as a proof or disproof that the incident occurred.  I have already detailed my principled objections to this as it related to Roy Moore so the reader can look at that for more background.

What’s setting me off as I am writing this is the overwhelming hypocrisy and even rank stupidity surrounding this approach, by people who have built their entire political machine around the ‘victim.’  Meanwhile, they have no … continue reading...

South Dakota vs. Wayfair: Taxation without Representation

One of the complaints that fueled the American revolution was that the colonialists were enduring ‘taxation without representation.’  The British king was levying taxes on people who were subject to the king, but did not have the same rights to advocate for themselves that others who were subject to the king had.

Let us propose a scenario:  I, an author and a publisher, sell a digital download to someone living in, say, France.  Should I be collecting tax on that sale and sending the tax to France?  Since I am not a citizen of France, there is no sense in … continue reading...