Posts Tagged by incarnation

Episcopal Priest Told She Can’t be Muslim And Christian

The Christian Post this morning has a bit about an Episcopal priest who claimed to be ‘100% Christian and 100% Muslim’ being ‘defrocked.’

A brief quote from the article:

Convinced that her new Muslim faith did not contradict her beliefs as a Christ follower, Redding declared she was both a Muslim and a Christian.

None of these things surprise me. This is all par for the course in today’s relativistic climate and typical in liberal Christianity. What surprises me? What surprises me is that the Episcopal denomination cared at all. I mean, aren’t they a little past being concerned about truth, the Bible, and firm stands over what the Scriptures clearly say?

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Prelude to an Argument for Christianity: The Jewish People

It took a few years after my personal battle with atheism for me to realize the importance of Jesus’ Jewishness in understanding Christianity- and defending it. The character of the Jewish people at that time is well documented by both the Old Testament and extra-biblical sources. Some things about Christianity, or perhaps more precisely, the New Testament, make no sense apart from the Jewish context that it arose in. The brief video presentation below is not an argument for Christianity but rather foundation laying for such an argument. Everyone loves a puzzle! Puzzle me this- how has the Jewish nation managed to remain intact over thousands of years in the face of immense hostility to the point where they were able to emerge in numbers enough to re-claim their ancient stomping grounds? When you’re done with that, how did a people whose devotion to “Hear Oh Israel, The Lord your God is ONE” managed to become the womb for a new world view where God became a man?

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Herr Professor Strikes Back: atheist Deacon Duncan takes issue with my arguments

I noticed the other day that someone had taken the time to respond at length to my post discussing trancendence, immanence, logic and superlogic. Then I woke up this morning to find out he had posted again on it! Herr Professor, this is just too much! 🙂 Herr Professor, now going by Deacon Duncan, knows that I prefer to have extended discussions on my discussion forum but he has sufficiently stroked my ego that I think a post or two is warranted. It is not every day that I am described as smart and sophisticated and that my arguments are clever. However, since the Professor already is two posts ahead of me he will have to be patient as I catch up. Below is part one. Please read this to the very end, or not at all.

For this entry I am responding mainly to his first article, ‘Can God do Nonsense?’

From the start, I’d like to point out that H. Professor admitted one of my contentions as reasonable. I had argued that an evaluation of God’s ‘omni’ nature doesn’t require that he performs nonsensical demands, like making a rock he cannot lift. I said that even atheists can accept this, and H. Professor did.

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Transcendence and Immanence, Logic and Superlogic- and Sublogic

Orthodox Christianity holds that God is both a transcendent entity and immanent. If you understand what Christians propose to be true about God, you understand why both attributes follow necessarily. All religions boil down to some expression of one of these two attributes, usually to the exclusion of one to the other. Deism, for example, emphasizes transcendence and despises immanence. Various forms of paganism emphasize immanence, that is they identify ‘God’ with the universe and reject that there is a God ‘outside’ it. Even atheism takes a position here: naturalism is just another variation on immanence and ‘God’ is just another label for the ‘universe.’

Christianity insists that God is both transcendent and immanent.

At any rate, there are some implications of this and I think it would be helpful to understand some arguments regarding Christian theism. I can begin with by trotting out the old ‘Can God create a rock that he cannot lift or move?’ line. The contention is that if God is all powerful he should be able to do this but in doing so he would simultaneously undermine his own omnipotence. Most of the time this is answered by pointing out that some statements are just nonsense and God’s omni-characteristics do not require him to be able to achieve the nonsensical. To understand how this is nonsensical we might take on the next line in this attack, “Can God make a round square?” We see in this case that what is involved is simply definitional. If round is properly and consistently defined and asked to apply to a square, also properly and consistently defined, then the request is nonsensical. Something doesn’t become reasonable just because you insert ‘Can God’ in front of it.

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A Christian Review of Anne Rice’s The Road to Cana

Anne Rice’s “Road to Cana.” Reviewed by Anthony Horvath Buy on Amazon.com: Christ the Lord: The Road to Cana (Christ the Lord) Hardcover: 256 pages Publisher: Knopf (March 4, 2008) Language: English ISBN-10: 1400043522 ISBN-13: 978-1400043521 Book Description: Anne Rice’s second book in her hugely ambitious and courageous life of Christ begins during his last […]

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The Best Arguments For Christianity

The best arguments for Christianity aren’t arguments at all.  For example, in this post here I even argue that pure, logical arguments, have a very limited value.  In fact, to really set the stage for my claims in this post, let me call attention to the fact that in the Scriptures, old testament and new, […]

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Thoughts on Death and God in the Morning

This morning my wife woke me and I was having a terrible dream.  In the dream, I lost most of my family… wife, children, siblings… Now, usually I am able to ‘control’ my dreams or otherwise inform myself in the dream that it is in fact only a dream.  It was odd that this dream […]

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The Case of Pullman and the Missing Incarnation

Everyone loves a good mystery. As I was reading Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass for my review I kept waiting to hear some dramatic attack on the person of Christ and the doctrine of the incarnation. In fact, the series rarely mentions Jesus at all, and certainly never substantively. Several hypotheses occur to me: Perhaps […]

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