web analytics

Tag: Social distancing

Flu vaccine to blame for Italy’s numbers? What about New York’s?

Italy is still withering away after almost 3 weeks of a complete shut down of their entire country.  As of this writing, they have 11,591 deaths and a deaths/million people of 192.  Now, I know what you’re thinking.  How is it that after three weeks of a total shut down of their entire country and massive social distancing restrictions, they still have thousands of new cases a day (4,050 today) and almost a thousand deaths a day (812 today)?

Right?  Because total shut downs and massive social distancing restrictions is supposed to save us.  Those are the key to our … continue reading...

No, you AREN’T the only person who cares about people

Before all this started… say, about the second week of Feb… people were asking me if I was worried about the coronavirus.  Based on the data at the time, my answer was, “I worry more about the response than I do the virus.”  It really wasn’t that hard to predict what was going to transpire.  Just need to be moderately observant.

However, this seems like a good time to repeat something else I’ve said numerous times over the years:  it isn’t the bad people that ‘worry’ me; bad people act in defiance of their own consciences which alert them to … continue reading...

What We Need Are More Sick People… The Smart Way to Handle the Pandemic

Contrary to what some people may think, I have not objected to the quarantine and stay at home orders in principle.  I don’t object to the ‘flattening the curve’ argument.  However, details matter, and so do limits.  Facts matter.  Truth matters.  Reality matters.   So, with the ‘flattening the curve’ argument, you don’t just get to make it as if it gives you carte blanche to do anything you want for however long you want to do it.  What you actually have to do is show, how IN FACT, a health provider network risks being overwhelmed.  This means producing numbers, figures, … continue reading...

Coronavirus: Where are all the dead Americans?

Let’s say that Town A has a case of ebola and Town B has a case of chicken pox.  You put them both under lock down.  When it is all said and done, neither ebola or the chicken pox escape their respective towns.  The measures were successful–but then, that’s a rather trivial observation if the whole question is whether or not the town should have been locked down in the first place.  The success of the lock down tells you nothing about the danger of the particular disease.  This seems to me to be self-evident, but apparently we need to … continue reading...