web analytics

Tag: heaven

“Anthony Horvath Goes To Heaven” Short Story Added to Dawkins, Flew, and Teresa Collection

Long time followers of this blog know that a collection of short stories I published on Kindle last year at about this time caused quite a stir.  It began with PZ Myers ‘reviewing’ the stories, and ended with a lot of folks coming by my site to flame me and even threaten me.  (Don’t worry, everything has been archived, including IP addresses).  Myers even violated my copyright in the process.  You may see this post for more on that.

I have now updated the collection with a foreword and two new short stories.  Each of the two new stories is … continue reading...

PZ Myer’s ‘Reviews’ “Richard Dawkins Goes to Heaven”

So, Mr. Myer’s review of my short story is in.  Enjoy.

As this is probably the last time for awhile that PZ is going to grace my blog with his presence, I’d like to make a request of him.  He is best buds with Dawkins, after all.  I’ve been hoping Dawkins would at some point own up to a piece of academic sloppiness on his part, but haven’t cared enough about it to put it in front of his eyes personally.  PZ and he are bosom buddies, though, both of whom no doubt are “lovers of truth and reason” and … continue reading...

Reader’s Guide to “Richard Dawkins Goes to Heaven.”

Third in a series of reader’s guides for my short story collection, “Richard Dawkins, Antony Flew, and Mother Teresa Go to Heaven.”  This one is for the Richard Dawkins story primarily, but may be applicable to the others.  For more details, see previous posts.


How Not to Read Imaginative Literature

What follows is an extreme condensation of chapter 14 in Mortimer J. Adler’s How to read a Book.

1.       Do not read imaginative literature as if its goal is to convey knowledge as such. The goal of imaginative literature is to communicate an experience itself- one that the reader can … continue reading...

Richard Dawkins Goes to Heaven? Short Story

What?  The uncompromising atheist Richard Dawkins goes to heaven?  While remaining an atheist?  How is this possible?  And yet, in this short story written by yours truly, something very much like that happens…  Read this short story, along with two others, on Kindle. You can also buy for Barnes and Noble’s Nook.

What sounds like the beginning of a very bad joke is actually the title of a collection of three poignant short stories by author Anthony Horvath. Each story draws from what is publicly known about these three notable persons and places them in the presence of … continue reading...

Would an atheist be happy in hell? Cue the Twilight Zone Theme Song…

On a recent thread on my discussion forum an atheist endorsed the view:  “It is better to rule in hell than serve in heaven.”  Of course, this atheist, like all atheists, rejects any notion that heaven and hell are real.  Nonetheless, there are a number of reasons for making the argument.  It essentially amounts to fundamental rejection of the ‘terms of engagement’ that Christians contend that God has laid out.   (This is especially fundamental when the atheist is, as in this example, an Ayn Rand Objectivist).  Additional layers of the argument take it as true for the sake of argument … continue reading...

The Growth of the Early Church: A Testimony Believed. Martyrs for what they saw not what they believed.

The Growth of the Early Church: A Testimony Believed.

This essay was written in response to challenges to demonstrate that the early Christians died because of their testimony, and their unwillingness to reject their testimony. In other words, they believed that they had actually seen certain events, and chose to die rather than deny what they had seen. Contrast with an event like 9-11, where we talk about 19 Muslims flying into the towers ‘because of their beliefs.’ I will contend in this essay that the early martyrs were driven on by what they witnessed with their own eyes- externally- continue reading...