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Tag: jerusalem

Three words Christians abuse: church, worship, love

The title of this post does not do the matter justice.  The word ‘abuse’ is too mild, and it might be even more accurate to say that in actual fact the sweeping trend within Christendom is that there is outright plain ignorance on what these terms mean.  The charge only matters at all to those Christians who believe that the Scriptures are the final and ultimate authority.  A huge swath of people who call themselves Christians obviously don’t, so this post is not really for them, even though they share in the guilt.   Of course, the term ‘Christian’ itself is … continue reading...

Prelude to an Argument for Christianity: The Jewish People

It took a few years after my personal battle with atheism for me to realize the importance of Jesus’ Jewishness in understanding Christianity- and defending it.  The character of the Jewish people at that time is well documented by both the Old Testament and extra-biblical sources.  Some things about Christianity, or perhaps more precisely, the New Testament, make no sense apart from the Jewish context that it arose in.  The brief video presentation below is not an argument for Christianity but rather foundation laying for such an argument.  Everyone loves a puzzle!  Puzzle me this- how has the Jewish nation … continue reading...

Easter is no Legend, the Resurrection is no mere myth: Myth Made Fact is a Different Story

It is that time of year again, when skeptics begin leveling their claims that Christianity is just a re-packaged bit of borrowed paganism and [insert your conspiracy theory here].  For the sake of this post, let’s merely concede that there are similarities to ancient myths and train our minds on the critical distinction:  none of them are set against a historical backdrop as fleshed out as Christianity.  In other words, it may be absolutely true that Christianity is ‘borrowed’ but the fact that the resurrection actually happened, nonetheless, only means looking with less skeptical eyes on the ‘ancient myths.’  For … continue reading...