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Tag: joy

Reflections on the ‘Dragon Mom’

Posted this at the WI-LFL blog:

Someone pointed me to an op-ed in the NY Times by a ‘dragon mom.’  Her son, born with Tay-Sachs, is not expected to live beyond three years old.  And yet, despite this- or is it because of this?-  the joy she has with him is immense and incalculable.   Our society bends over backwards to ‘spare’ children and mothers of this joy, offering a quick and easy termination.  But if you read this article, you see that even in the face of impending grief, joy prevails every time.

Of course, if we’re honest, we understand … continue reading...

Reflections on the 4.5 Million Dollar Child they Wanted to Abort

Posted this at the LFL-WI blog.

This is the sort of story that really gets under my skin.  A Florida couple won a lawsuit against her doctors, asserting that they failed to discover that their child would be born disabled (no arms and one leg).  The woman testified that she would have definitely aborted the child if they had that information.

“They went from the heights of joyous expectations to the depths of despair,” their attorney Robert Bergin told the jury during closing arguments Wednesday.

It is a sham to think that the timing makes any difference.  My wife continue reading...

Joy held hostage to Evil- on rejoicing in Bin Laden’s Death

I posted a blog entry at the Christian Post recently.

The reported death of Bin Laden generated crowds of people on the street wrapped in American flags and cheering.  A casual look at the reaction to this reaction revealed to me that many people shared my apprehension with such a response.  Different reasons for the apprehension have been produced:

  • The Scriptures tell us not to rejoice in the deaths of our enemies:  “I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but that the wicked turn from his way and live.” Ezekiel 33:11
  • We should be deeply sorrowful about
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On a more masculine heaven

C.S. Lewis wrote,

There is no need to be worried by facetious people who try to make the Christian hope of   heaven   ridiculous by saying they do not want   to spend eternity playing harps.     The answer to such people is that if they cannot understand books written for grown-ups, they should not talk about them.   All the scriptural imagery (harps, crowns, gold, etc.) is, of course, a merely symbolic attempt to express the inexpressible.   Musical instruments are mentioned because for many people (not all) music is the thing known in the present life which most strongly suggests ecstasy and infinity.

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