Posts Tagged by moral relativism

Atheists on Morality: Jumping out of the Bottomless Pit

Atheists have a problem.  Ok, they have lots of problems.  🙂  But this one is a big one:  how to explain morality. Now, for some reason atheists remained confused on some basic aspects of the issue.   It is common to hear from their camp something to the effect, “We do not need God to be […]

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Interview question on the writing of Fidelis- a post apocalyptic setting for moral exploration

I was handed a bunch of interview questions a while back and we actually had an audio interview but that interview is now lost in the hills of Argentina (I kid you not).  I have been answering them one by one on my blog at www.birthpangs.com but this one (and a couple to come) I […]

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Human Rights Policies Without Teeth; Lips that flap, No Action to Follow

With the situation in Darfur still percolating and the news of Kosovo declaring independence and of course the US presidential campaign in full swing I have been thinking a bit about ‘human rights’ lately.  For example, I have been pondering what duty, if any, a person or nation has to those who are being oppressed […]

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Blog Round Up: A Christian Response to Westboro ‘Baptist’ Church, Court Decision and Christianity

 You need to a flashplayer enabled browser to view this YouTube video (Thanks to this site for finding the Youtube video for me) I heard with satisfaction that the so called ‘Westboro Baptist Church’ had lost its court case and was penalized some 11 million dollars for protesting at the funeral of a fallen soldier. […]

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A Jesus for the Atheists: A Panzy?

The fact is, the reason why Jesus is compelling is not that he was a sissy pacifist, but rather that he was overwhelmingly mighty, but, to accomplish a particular deed, he set aside his aggressiveness and took whatever was thrown at him. He could have overthrown the gates of Hades by force, but only by laying down his arms did he not only defeat Hades but also freed its prisoners.

When a soldier throws himself on a grenade to save his fellows, all except a handful of Ayn Randian objectivists applaud his valor. Here, to save his fellows it would have done no good to charge out of the trench when the grenade tumbled in and kill those who tossed the grenade. Here, only self-sacrifice could achieve the goal, but it did not follow that the soldier was soft and tender in spirit. You see, it depends a great deal on the circumstances and what one wants to achieve. There is a time for aggressiveness but there is also a time for meekness. The problem is knowing exactly which time it is. (Ecc. 3)

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