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Tag: objectivism

A theological basis for rank individualism in society and elsewhere

This essay is long- some 2,000 words.  But I think it is worth reading.  Print it out if you like if that makes it easier.

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‘Individualism’ has a bad rap, even among Christians.  To be fair, there are things in ‘individualism’ that I think are unhealthy or even immoral, too, but the key thing to remember is that any opposite of ‘individualism’ is not necessarily preferable.  If we’re going to raise up ‘inter-connectedness’ (a neutral term, I hope) it must be done thoughtfully, and it cannot obliterate that which is moral or good in ‘individualism.’

The only folks that … continue reading...

Atheist Response to The Toy Story Gospel

A while back I posted a blog on the ‘Gospel according to Toy Story.’  It has generated an atheist response.

I am afraid to say the blogger needs to go back to the drawing board.  He was greatly confused about what I actually said and so much of his reply just doesn’t fit what I was saying.

For example, he said that I presented Toy Story as a Christian allegory.  I did no such thing.  I said that it had theological themes.  There is a big difference there.  So, the blogger kept thinking I was trying to … continue reading...

The Gospel According to the Movie Toy Story: YOU. ARE. A. TOY!

Update:  A response to the folks at Somethingawful.com is at the bottom.


Toy Story is one of those movies that is constantly playing at my house.  It is a ‘safe’ movie for kids and it has enough material for the grown-ups that I don’t mind it playing over and over again.  It was on again last night.  In fact, it is on right now.

If you don’t know Toy Story, it is simply a story about toys- toys who come alive when you aren’t looking.  In otherwords, a stock ‘toy story.’  In both movies there is a curious perspective presented … continue reading...

The Need for an Absolute Frame of Reference For there to be Ultimate Meanings

When I was in college I made a nuisance of myself once by finding the slope of a vertical line (which, we are told, is ‘undefined.’)  Impossible, you say.  As did the math instructor.  But I ‘found’ it by rotating the grid beneath the line and recalculated, for now, of course, the line wasn’t perfectly vertical anymore.

You may say that this was a cheap trick and doesn’t really find the slope of a ‘vertical’ line.  You might say that we are required, by assumption, to take the graph in a certain way.  I might reply that that is only … continue reading...