web analytics

Tag: public sphere

I’ve changed my mind: Keep your religious views about abortion out of politics!

Or… I’ll keep mine out, if you’ll keep yours… or something like that… keep reading…

In our country, there is a general feeling that only positions backed by actual fact should drive public policy. ‘Religion’ is perceived to be the realm of personal opinion. Even Christians tend to accept the view that people are allowed to have their opinion, but they aren’t allowed to impose that opinion on others. The result is that many Christians refrain from acting ‘politically’ because they see their own beliefs as nothing more than ‘mere opinion.’

Secularists tend to be people who have dispensed with … continue reading...

The Jaffe Memo, Part 4: THEY mix religion and politics! – The Hyde Amendment

In Part 3, I promised to give an example of the totalitarian attempt to suppress religious expression in the public sphere.  Here we go.

Consider the HARRIS v. McRAE Supreme Court case of 1980.  This case revolved around the Constitutionality of the Hyde Amendment.  You will recall that Roe vs. Wade had made abortion on demand a ‘fundamental’ right in 1973.  Those who opposed abortion worked swiftly to at least ensure that government money, in particular through Medicaid, would not be used to pay for abortions.  This was the Hyde Amendment.

Now, it is very interesting to note that when … continue reading...

Religion and Politics Must Mix- Jaffe Memo reaction – Part 3

The last part ended with a question that this part shall now answer.

Why?  Because ‘religious’ views are just one example of a ‘world view.’  I asked earlier, “Ought not our attitudes and behaviors in political society be driven by our views about the world?  If not our own views about the world, then whose views?”  The very nature of a ‘world view’ is that it is all encompassing.  If we are not allowed to advocate for things personally and publicly because of our views about the world, then obviously we do not live in a free society.   Obviously, if … continue reading...