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Tag: supernatural

Transcendence and Immanence, Logic and Superlogic- and Sublogic

Orthodox Christianity holds that God is both a transcendent entity and immanent.  If you understand what Christians propose to be true about God, you understand why both attributes follow necessarily.  All religions boil down to some expression of one of these two attributes, usually to the exclusion of one to the other.   Deism, for example, emphasizes transcendence and despises immanence.  Various forms of paganism emphasize immanence, that is they identify ‘God’ with the universe and reject that there is a God ‘outside’ it.  Even atheism takes a position here:  naturalism is just another variation on immanence and ‘God’ is just … continue reading...

Natural Versus Revealed Religion: How Atheists Drop the Ball

This essay makes the assertion that atheists fail to distinguish between ‘natural revelation’ and ‘special revelation’ but they are not entirely to blame.  Arguments for the existence of God tend to be in the realm of ‘natural’ theology.  Then, Christians speak of the Bible as revelation without qualification.  Unfortunately, atheists almost uniformly believe they are smarter and more well informed than every other person on the globe, so we would expect that they would be able to see past these factors to Christianity’s toughest arguments instead of attacking the weakest links.

It is not my purpose today to offer one … continue reading...

Atheism and Facts and the Escape from Oneself

A recent commenter said:  “Well I don’t believe in invisible entities like gods, angels, spirits, or pixies, faeries,etc…”

I immediately thought to myself all the invisible things that he does believe in.   I thought of the invisible things that the scientific community believes in- like all the missing dark matter and the millions of years which life is said to have evolved in which is ever and always invisible to direct observation- and realized with a start a fact which of course I have long been aware of… atheists who hide behind science in their mockery of those who believe … continue reading...

The Growth of the Early Church: A Testimony Believed. Martyrs for what they saw not what they believed.

The Growth of the Early Church: A Testimony Believed.

This essay was written in response to challenges to demonstrate that the early Christians died because of their testimony, and their unwillingness to reject their testimony. In other words, they believed that they had actually seen certain events, and chose to die rather than deny what they had seen. Contrast with an event like 9-11, where we talk about 19 Muslims flying into the towers ‘because of their beliefs.’ I will contend in this essay that the early martyrs were driven on by what they witnessed with their own eyes- externally- continue reading...